Watercooling Woes

Discussion in 'Cooling / Overclocking' started by Recardo, Sep 22, 2014.

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  1. Recardo

    Recardo New Member

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    Hi folks,

    Having a bit of an issue with my water cooling. I purchased a kit from Kustom a couple of months ago. Now for some reason the fluid looks a little cloudy and there's some sort of sediment in the tank. It's never been opened apart from when I installed it and filled it and its only just appeared. Does anyone have any idea where this could have came from, this kit in question is a Alphacool NexXxoS Cool Answer 240 LT/ST Kit.
    Thanks
     
  2. Bryanese

    Bryanese Tasted LAN and liked it.

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    Without seeing a picture of said clouding, three possibilities come to mind:

    1. Debris from the machining process, i.e., tiny pieces of swarf (metal) from inside either your waterblock or your radiator. The manufacturing process does try to eliminate stuff like this but unfortunately it's not all that uncommon to open up a brand new waterblock and find tiny (we're talking thousands of an inch here) bits of metal inside the heat exchange channels. It just comes with the territory; machining hundreds of tiny groves.

    The best solution is just to flush the whole system out and replace the coolant. With custom loops it's advised that you do a coolant refresh every six months anyways.

    2. Microbiological growth, i.e., algae and the like. Growth can be inhibited by the use of additives like PT Nuke or by sliding a silver coil into your tubing somewhere. UV light can help inhibit growth too.

    Again, best solution is to just flush the lot out and clean your tubing and blocks in a chlorine solution (something powdered you add water to like sink sanitiser).

    3. Dirt and grease, perhaps introduced either when you've been sticking the whole lot together or maybe grease off the insides of the pump.

    Kustom stock SysClean-HPD which might be worth trying just to clear up your loop. Could tide you over for a few more months until you do a coolant refresh.

    Hope this helps! : )
     
  3. Recardo

    Recardo New Member

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    Thanks for the info, nice to hear from someone who knows what they are talking about,

    It actually looks like a sand or something similar. I do have photos on my phone but they're not the clearest. What coolant would you recommend as I'm using the CKC stuff that came with the kit. There is a few bubbles that have settled in the loop but these have been there since I built it and no matter what I try they wont leave the loop although the amount reduced significantly when I topped it up with coolant.
     
  4. Recardo

    Recardo New Member

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  5. Bryanese

    Bryanese Tasted LAN and liked it.

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    Hehe, no bother. I've been watercooling for five years now and just recently spent the GDP of a small island nation on a new custom loop for my next PC. XD But I digress.

    The sediment at the bottom of your reservoir appears to be pretty heavy; the pictures don't seem to show it moving any which suggests it weighs a bit. I'm going to guess that it's come out of your radiator and should just flush straight out with no hassle.

    The clouding in your tubing definitely isn't due to air bubbles? I can't quite tell as the photos are a bit grainy. If the coolant in your reservoir is clear (sediment aside) and it's just your tubing that's cloudy, it could be down to plasticisers (additives which make tubing more flexible but tend to leach to water and glycols over time). I won't get into plasticisers here because the best guide in the universe and a must read for any watercooler can be found here.

    As far as coolants go, it kinda comes down to what you require in a coolant. When I first started, my main concern was spillage on my components so I went with Feser One which as it had an incredibly low order of electrical conductivity. It also came in pretty colours and was UV reactive. While it was fine for a newb watercooler, it's relatively high density and additives/dyes inevitably gunked up my blocks and radiator after a period of a few years. For this reason, I'm now sticking simply to distilled water with a few drops PT Nuke to stave off microbiological growth.

    Genuinely, double distilled water (which is something like 99.999% pure) is about the best coolant you can use (uni lectures on fluid dynamics and heat transfer taught me that) and don't be fooled by marketing hype with things like 'nanofluids' and corrosion inhibitors. Water only contains two elements, hydrogen and oxygen and as such, its molecules are as small as any fluid's will get. These nanofluids are complex, chain carbon and flourine arrangements and while they have low orders of conductivity, they'll always be denser than water. Corrosion inhibitors aren't really all that necessary because galvanic corrosion will only occur to any noticeable degree when aluminium is present in your loop because it has a rather high standard potential.

    Again, hope this helps! : )
     
  6. FinlandsForsh

    FinlandsForsh ChrisForsh

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    also remember aluminium blocks can corrode with certain fluids


    check your coolant is right for your blocks
     
  7. Digital Doctor

    Digital Doctor Loving AMD's new AM1 CPU

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    Deionised water with a capfull of red antifreeze is all ive ever used, have done for years even in mixed metal systems with zero problems.

    I refuse to pay 10 quid for a litre of fesser that performs worse
     
  8. Ninjagordy

    Ninjagordy Winner of The Game (UJFL)

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    to the best of my knowledge that water block is full copper.... i used windscreen wash in mines!!
     
  9. Digital Doctor

    Digital Doctor Loving AMD's new AM1 CPU

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    Yep thats fine if it contains glycol which most of them do
     
  10. Bryanese

    Bryanese Tasted LAN and liked it.

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    Guys, please don't spread misinformation regarding watercooling.

    In a mixed metal loop, corrosion WILL occur no matter what the material is. The extent to which corrosion occurs depends on the differences in the electrical potentials the various metals have. In reality, when you're using copper and brass, it's almost negligible but it *does* still occur. This is the case no matter what the metals are and no matter what the fluid so long as it suffices as an electrolyte.

    Regarding aluminium specifically, the reason it's demonised so in watercooling is purely because of it's high standard potential at -1.66V (in comparison to copper at 0.16V). The fluid it's in doesn't make a difference, if it works as an electrolyte and there's a potential difference in the loop, corrosion will occur.

    Seriously, where does all this glycol nonsense come from? All it's going to do is lower the specific heat capacity of your fluid, i.e. it won't help make your loop cooler. Sure, if your computer is somewhere below 0°C, adding eththylene glycol will lower the *freezing point* and you're coolent won't freeze but it won't actually make it 'colder'. Other than ammonia, water has one of the highest specific heat capacities of any fluid in the world at 4.19kJ/kg.K – why would you want to lower it by adding loads of rubbish?

    As per the advice I gave (based on scientific principles and not on forum hearsay), the best coolant to use is double distilled water with an anti-growth additive or a silver coil. So long as you aren't using aluminium in your loop, corrosion won't occur to any great extent and as long as there's something to stop microbiological growth, you're golden. Water is your friend.
     
  11. Digital Doctor

    Digital Doctor Loving AMD's new AM1 CPU

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    Glycol is used in cars for a reason, to cool and stop corrosion, i have never had any issues mixing my copper cpu block with my 3 alloy radiators its all complete BS, fesser one is BS

    Companies like fesser try to scare people into buying their products, even if corrosion was to occur it would take at least 6 months to begin, glycol and deionised water does the trick and its all you will ever need, the properties of glycol have anti corrosion inhibitors for this very reason and its already in fesser one coolant.

    Fesser are the ones adding junk to their coolants thats why they dont perform as good, ie adding UV and colouring.

    Then theres the muppets using tap water, a great way of contracting and pumping legionnaires disease through your system.

    Red antifreeze is the one i use but you can get blue aswell, its bloody great never had any problems at all they keep my cpu in the 24 idle and 65 full load area, as my system is red themed it looks the part without adding dyes or colour bombs.

    every 6 months is ideally when the coolant should be changed anyway.