PCI Express cable

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting' started by Hoggie, Feb 4, 2015.

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  1. Hoggie

    Hoggie New Member

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    Hi guys I hope you can help.

    I have a m4a785td-v evo motherboard and just bought a xfx r7260x graphics card. The problem I have now is I cannot get power to the card,have done some research and now think the issue is I need a pci express powercable. What cable do I need? And where would I put it into my motherboard for power?, the card needs a 6 pin.

    Thanks
    H
    PS running Windows 8.1 pro
     
  2. Bryanese

    Bryanese Tasted LAN and liked it.

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    Hey.

    Yes, while your R7 260X does draw power from the PCIe slot, it still needs a dedicated source which comes directly from your PSU.

    If you look at the image of this similar R7 260X, in the top, right-hand corner, you should see a female six pin PCIe power socket on the PCB of the card:

    [​IMG]

    Your card should have a similar socket located somewhere along its back end, though, it may be mounted along the front edge. Should be pretty obvious either way.

    You're going to need a cable which comes from your PSU and plugs directly into the card. Most modern PSUs include a PCIe power cable (be it six pin or eight pin), so check the cables coming off your PSU for something like this:

    [​IMG]

    If your PSU doesn't have a six pin PCIe power cable, Kustom sell adaptors which turn two molex connectors (the long, flat, four pin ones) into a six pin PCIe cable:


    [​IMG]

    You can find them here: http://www.kustompcs.co.uk/acatalog/info_1909.html

    Hope this helps. (^^,)
     
  3. Hoggie

    Hoggie New Member

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    Thanks Bryanese,

    Do I connect the both of them? Can you confirm with the picture this is what you mean??

    View attachment 3279

    Also my old card is an ATI radeon HD 4600 would you recommend me removing it and just use my R7 260X, or can I have both??
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Archaon

    Archaon Eats, Drinks, Sleeps Kustom

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    Generally speaking bits in a PC only connect to the right part and generally go the right way, but yes those are the right connectors.

    Yes you connect both of them due to the power requirements. If possible it's worth seeing if you have two of those 4-pin molex plugs on different cables coming out of the PSU.

    If your existing card doesn't need that power cable I'd suggest double checking that your PSU meets the power requirements for the new card. PSUs vary considerably in quality and output so they're normally generic guidelines but worth having a look anyway.

    Get rid of the 4600 unless you need it for some reason.
     
  5. Bryanese

    Bryanese Tasted LAN and liked it.

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    Ah, Archaon makes a sterling point (one I shamefully overlooked). Do you know which brand of power supply (PSU) you've got and its rated wattage? The R7 260X needs at least a 500W PSU – not that it uses 500W, it's just that your PSU needs some headroom between powering the motherboard, CPU, hard disks and whatever else as well as the graphics card.

    Yes, the attached picture shows two molex connectors. These are the ones you'd connect the wee adapter I mentioned to.

    The HD 46(50/70): there's absolutely no reason you'd keep it in there. Your R7 260X will output to three monitors, so you don't need the HD 46(50/70) to drive a second or third monitor. It also won't run in conjunction with the R7 260X and offer greater graphics power or whatever, it'll just be in the machine wasting electricity. Keep it around as a spare or stick it in another machine or bin it. Might get £20-£30 for it on fleBay.